The Seascape 27, a modern-day trailer racer, said the judges, is the complete package. This Slovenian-built creation from a pair of Mini-Transat veterans (Samual Manard is the designer) is only 3,100 pounds, and its billed as a mini crossover. In Europe, they’re racing them one-design and offshore. It’s quick, road-ready, ocean-worthy, and perfect for weekends with the tribe. For $120,000 it’s fully loaded and racing.

The interior is an exemplary use of volume, with a retracting spinnaker bin, a head, two big and long settees, and sitting headroom. The centerboard’s manual hydraulic pump brings it home with a few pumps.

“The thing is incredible, upwind and downwind,” said Allen after sailing. “It looks great going through the water, has a nice groove with the Code Zero in light air, and there’s a lot of boat for its size. They say it’s for shorthanded coastal racing, but you’re going to race it in the weeknight series and overnight races, and be really happy with it.”

“It’s lively, and with no backstays, it’s simple, said Rich. “The construction is fine and seemed durable. There’s a lot of innovation inside the boat.”

“I echo the light-air performance,” said Stewart. I noticed right away was how clean the wake is. The chine is in the right spot and the double rudders have positive control. The big J-measurement allows a non-overlapping jib that has grunt. They didn’t cram everything into the cockpit for shorthanded sailing; it’s big enough that we weren’t tripping over each other. It’s a fantastic boat all around.”

“Really, really cool boat,” concluded Allen. “For shorthanded sailing, it’s a sweet ride.”

DESIGNED FOR: Shorthanded racing, camper cruising, and daysailing

REQUIRED CREW: Solo, twin, or four around the cans

BEST ATTRIBUTES: Innovative details, versatility, performance, trailerability, one-design class

PRICE AS TESTED: $120,000, well equipped